Paper reproduction signed by Cepea researchers is allowed provided the following is mentioned: author's name, author's professional qualification and affiliation to Cepea as well as the publication date on this page.

Brazil's image in international agricultural trade

Over the last 20 years, Brazil has presented a significant rise in the international market, becoming a major exporter of agricultural products. However, this position is threatened by some aspects that will need special attention in the coming years.

 

First of all, it is important to mention that, in February 2020, Brazil lost some privileges in international trades because it had left the list of developing countries of the US. This measure has not affected Brazil directly because there is no current dispute within the WTO (World Trade Organization) referring to previous benefits that Brazil had. However, this change may bring conflicts to future trades involving Brazilian exports.

 

The world turns its attention to Brazil every time there are environment questions. The country has been facing several trade retaliations due the environmental irresponsibility wide-spread by the media, a scenario that has worsened this year. Brazil is currently suffering from international capital outflow (European investment funds, for instance), which is explained partly by the absence of an environmental management that aims to solve problems that Brazil faces to preserve its biomes, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to protect the environment in general.

 

It is clear that it is not possible to keep business as usual. In the coming years, the environmental policy must be a priority, which has not been currently observed. If this subject does not have the attention it deserves, the actions of a minority – which still uses deforestation, slash-and-burn agriculture, exploitation and soil degradation as part of production – may still be in the spotlight. If sustainable practices that are already adopted are not highlighted in discussions about national environmental policies, we will face severe consequences. An example of this situation is that the Mercosur-European Union Agreement is at risk, with a debate in the European Commission that raises several questions about Brazilian environmental policies and the compliance with environmental laws in Brazil.

 

The health of herds and the quality of Brazilian products affect directly agribusiness exports. Both public and private sectors have combined efforts over the last years to meet international standards. The status of foot-and-mouth disease free country without vaccination, for instance, is closer to be achieved due to the Strategic Plan of the National Program for the Eradication and Prevention of Foot-and-Mouth Disease (2017-2026). The Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply (Mapa) has also been attempting to improve and update other animal and plant health programs through the National Plan for Control of Residues and Contaminants and Federal Agricultural Defense Laboratories.

 

At the same time, the private sector has been investing in infrastructure and processes to improve quality control and product inspection – specially due to the possibility of establishing inspection programs for animal and plant products, fertilizers, veterinary medicines, animal feeding, seeds and inputs, which is in discussion at Mapa.

 

In spite of significant efforts of both public and private sectors to build a “Brazil brand”, it is still a long way to consolidate it. While we do not have a production that meets international requirements for both environment and health, our products will not have the aggregated value that Brazilian exporters want and they will not gain access to more demanding markets, which consequently pay more for certificated products.

 

The potential expansion of Brazilian agribusiness exports will take place if the sector’s growth is related to health, safety and sustainability. These are the three main pillars to build a solid and internationally recognized “Brazil brand”.

19/04/2021 - Food security and Brazil's role in the global food supply - Andréia Adami 18/03/2021 - Labor market and the pandemic: agribusiness' resilience through crisis - Felipe Miranda de Souza Almeida 22/02/2021 - History, challenges and the importance of Cepea's milk research - Natália Grigol 17/02/2021 - Agricultural commodities: a new boom? - Geraldo Barros 01/02/2021 - Price oscillations for grains, fiber and tubers: from farmers to the retail market - Lucilio Rogerio Aparecido Alves 25/11/2020 - Brazil continues competitive in the world cattle farming - Thiago Bernardino de Carvalho 19/10/2020 - Effect of mobility restrictions on sales and prices in the ethanol producing segment in São Paulo state - Mirian Rumenos Piedade Bacchi 23/09/2020 - Influence of emotional factors caused by the coronavirus pandemic on cattle trades - Shirley Martins Menezes 23/09/2020 - Agribusiness, pandemics and the world economy - Geraldo Barros 16/09/2020 - Rice price increases bring relief to producers, but it does not cover losses over the last 5 crops - Mauro Osaki e Renato Garcia Ribeiro 03/09/2020 - Changes in consumption habits during quarantine may remain after social isolation - Fernanda Geraldini Palmieri 17/08/2020 - Covid-19 crisis affects cassava sector in different ways - Fábio Isaías Felipe 04/08/2020 - Rural Brazil: Covid-19, income and emergency aid - Nicole Rennó Castro and Geraldo Sant'Ana de Camargo Barros 28/07/2020 - Limited demand due to covid-19 presses down ethanol quotes, despite lower production - Ivelise Rasera Bragato Calcidoni 01/07/2020 - Blitzkrieg on agribusiness: what to expect? - Heloisa Lee Burnquist
back

Contact

cepea@usp.br
Preencha o formulário para realizar o download
x
Deseja receber informações do Cepea?

Type this code in the field next to